The Firefox Browser, Internet Freedom, Web Literacy, (yawn…)

But it’s really not a boring story at all. Back in the early days of the Internet, the first browser, called NCSA Mosaic, was born out of the University of Illinois National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Mosaic eventually became Netscape Navigator which spawned a not-for-profit organization founded in 1998 called Mozilla. Amazingly, 20 years later, this company is still around  and is one of the leaders in the fight to keep the Internet free and open.

Hardly anybody but techies know about it, but Mozilla makes Firefox which has recently received a major upgrade into a fast, powerful, safe, modern browser than can comfortably replace Google Chrome or Apple Safari. In fact, I’m typing this article using Firefox right now and, with the addition of an Ad Blocker, it seems even faster than Safari.

However, it is their mission that really sets them apart. Their recent email “Goodbye corporate domination” starts with the question “All browsers are the same, right?” Their response to their own question is fascinating:

Not quite. Firefox is on a mission — to be faster and leaner than ever, always respectful of your privacy and open like no other browser out there. Because it’s built for people, not profit. Firefox is part of Mozilla’s mission to keep you in control of your online experience and ensure that the web stays weird, healthy and inviting to all.

This sent me down a rabbit hole of learning about the many, many ways they are working to fulfill this mission. Everything from teaching “Web Literacy” to “The Mozilla Manifesto: Principles that guide our mission to promote openness, innovation & opportunity on the Web.”

In a world where the basic health of the Internet is in jeopardy from the repeal of Net Neutrality, the wide range of online security threats, and violations of the most basic issues of privacy, Mozilla is doing an incredible job addressing these threats and educating the public.

So even if you love Safari, Chrome, or (gasp) Edge, give Firefox a try (again, an Adblocker makes online life much nicer too!). You might like it or just give them a few bucks (and Wikipedia too). They even have a handy guide to switching that takes less than a minute.

We get so much for free from “the Internet,” it feels nice to give back a bit to the people to keep it that way.