iOS Grows Up Part 1

In a few short years, mobile operating systems have transformed modern society. The younger generations have for the most part skipped laptop and desktop computers and rely on mobile devices for all their online activities. From social media to messaging to watching hours of video, the small screen is the focus of their attention. Of course, voice calling is reserved for parents and emergencies while, depending on the country, SMS Messaging (and iMessage), Facebook (and Messenger), WhatsApp, Snapchat, WeChat, Instagram, Kik, etc. dominate their online lives. Written words replace spoken conversations, photos (selfies) convey more complex emotions, and short ephemeral videos entertain and inform. On a larger scale, YouTube has replaced network television, streaming music has replaced radio, and personalized recommendations from “influencers” trumps traditional advertising.

In this brave new world, the debate between iOS and Android rages on. How can Apple survive when 80% of the smartphone market is Android? It’s a classic question asked of every premium brand that exists successfully in the marketplace. Why buy a BMW when a Camry is excellent, reliable transportation? Why buy designer clothes when Target has great styles for less? It boils down to a few things that Apple does extremely well. First is excellent hardware, especially the iPhone camera. The second is a fanatical attention to software details including usability, security, a constant stream of innovations, and a massive, high quality App Store. They are also able to appeal a wide range of users. Millennials love advanced iMessage features such as group messaging, stickers, apps, emoji, and now the animated Animoji feature of the iPhoneX. Casual users find the default iPhone setup out of the box easy to adapt to. Add the Facebook app and email account information and they are happy. Photos (and the iPhone in general) get backed up to iCloud, messaging just works, and emailing is painless. To be fair, these features of Android are also easy to setup, but the experience is tainted by a wide variety of strange problems even with the most popular phones. Samsung phones ($849 for the S8) have the controversial “TouchWiz” user interface, Google Pixel ($949 for the XL 2) features a “clean, bloat-free experience with no unwanted apps” (a feature?!, a reaction to Samsung?), and even flagship phones like LG V30 ($800) get released with major flaws (a bad screen).

So to answer the question posed at the end of the last post, “How can Apple possibly survive giving something this valuable away for free?” The answer is simple, free iOS upgrades are one of the primary reasons people choose iOS over Android. It’s like getting a new phone every year without the cost of purchasing new hardware.

iOS users can rely on the fact that their product will be supported at no extra charge for at least three years. That means new features, security updates, and compatibility with other Apple products as soon as the update is released. By contrast, even flagship Android phones cannot be upgraded until the carrier “approves” the update which is sometimes several months later (if ever). Google Pixel phones are guaranteed to get updates immediately, but that’s a small part of the Android world.

So what did iOS users get with iOS 11 that demonstrates that it is growing up? Hang tight, that’s the topic of the next post and it straddles a different line, the blurring line between the desktop and mobile worlds.