Leaving LinkedIn After Over a Decade

It was a tough decision, but I finally closed and deleted my LinkedIn account. A professional lifeline for over a decade, it is hard to measure the value of the contacts I had there. However some online transgressions are impossible to overlook and violating privacy is at the top of my list. To be fair, it was probably in their terms and conditions, one of those “sacrifices” we make everyday as a trade for a valuable service offered at no charge, but flagrantly breaking the implicit trust involved in privacy required immediate action.

What did LinkedIn do? They accessed my profession and personal email contacts without my permission and used them to suggest new connections. Before you ask, I am 99.9% sure that I NEVER gave them permission to do this with the other 0.1% reserved for the remote possibility that they tricked me into it somehow. Throwaway email addresses that I only used once and have not used for 10 years were showing up in this list. Doing some research online, it was suggested that LinkedIn might have gotten these addresses when I had LinkedIn open and Gmail open in two browser tabs at the same time. I’m not sure if this is true, but it would be one way to explain it.

It must be tempting for a company like LinkedIn to think that they are helping the world by connecting people professionally and the more connections, the more they are helping. Gmail does something similar by looking into Gmail accounts and suggesting ads so why can’t LinkedIn do the same? But it’s not the same by a long shot. There is an expectation of separation when multiple tabs are open in a browser. Amazon doesn’t look to see what I purchased recently from Nordstrom online and even Facebook, for all their privacy issues over the years, doesn’t seem to make personal suggestions based on my email contacts stored in Gmail.

So goodby LinkedIn, we had a good run where I published over 180 articles on your publishing platform and connected with hundreds of other professionals. As your email said, maybe you’re sorry to see me go, but if you had wanted me to stay, you would have never have violated the trust we worked so hard to build.