Apple Demonstrates the Problem With Being “Perfect” – Part 1

Welcome to 2017! It would be great to start the year with a post about Apple creating the next generation of breakthrough products and providing them at reasonable prices, but unfortunately 2016 was rough. To make matters worse, lately the news has been sounding like Chicken Little, “The sky is falling!” Even the smallest complaints are being screamed from the rooftops. Last month’s Monthly Recap explored this in detail, but with the continuing deluge of negativity, it’s worth taking a step back to try to see the big picture.

In short, Apple is a victim of its own success. For the past decade, every year has brought another industry changing product or feature. The video of Steve Jobs’ iPhone 1 unveiling is a reminder of how revolutionary it was and still is. So much so that the rest of the industry is just not beginning to catch up. This dominance has made Apple a favorite target for critics, which begs the question: Why does Apple have to supply a continuous stream of “perfect products” when nobody else does? ReCode’s article, “All Apple gave us in 2016 was a thinner iPhone, a touch bar, and too many dongles” paints a bleak picture, but where consumers are spending their money sends a different message. Other tech news sources wrote recently, “Huge demand for Apple’s ‘boring’ iPhone 7 may lead to Apple’s highest revenue in history” and “From Apps to iPhones: Holiday Shoppers Invest in Apple.”

Maybe Apple products are becoming boring, but they’re profitable workhorses. I’m currently using an “ancient” 2012 MacBook Pro which feels almost as fast as it did four years ago and still runs the most current version of MacOS. It’s so good that a year ago, Cult of Mac wrote a post, “Why is Apple’s ancient 2012 MacBook Pro still so popular?” By comparison, a brand new Windows 10 machine that I purchased for a specific project last month already has had a two hour “anniversary” upgrade and still constantly bombards me weekly with forced update notifications requiring a reboot. The anniversary upgrade took so long that I almost turned it off midway through (which would have been a disaster). The 2012 MacBook took less than a half hour for its most recent major upgrade.

The next part of this series will look at Apple in relation to the other major players in the tech world: Microsoft and Google. Certainly some of the recent criticism is warranted, but how much?